Miracle kitten uses two of her nine lives…

07 July 2020

Much-loved pets like Shams, a nine-month-old miracle kitten, is just one of the many pets in desperate need of emergency care and treatment from PDSA’s frontline veterinary teams during the coronavirus crisis.

Sham’s life has been touch-and-go for a number of weeks after she was hit by a car in the middle of the night, leaving her with a broken pelvis and her life hanging in the balance. But her tale of woe did not stop there. Just one week into her recovery at home, she developed a potentially fatal womb infection – called pyometra.

Owner Amira Izeboudjene (24) said: “One night Shams didn’t come home like she always does. We were really worried as it was so unlike her. We found her in the middle of the road at 3am in the morning. She was bleeding from the mouth and nose, and couldn’t move.

“Me and my family were devastated at the thought of losing her, especially my mum who has a very close bond with her. Our other cat, who was 14-years-old, had passed away the week before so we couldn’t bear any more trauma.”

Shams was taken to the nearest vet in the middle of the night and, after receiving stabilising care and pain relief, was transferred to our Thamesmead PDSA Pet Hospital early the next morning.

PDSA Vet Hermione Hillen said: “Shams’ condition was critical and there was a high chance she wasn’t going to make it. X-rays revealed her pelvis was fractured and we were concerned about nerve damage to her bladder and tail too. But we were determined to do everything we could to help save her life.”

She was kept under close observation in critical care by our dedicated vet teams, and was placed on a fluid drip and painkillers for four nights. Thankfully, she recovered well and was allowed home to continue her recovery with her loving family.

But, one week later, Amira noticed Shams was acting strangely. She called PDSA for urgent advice.

Shams symptoms suggested she had pyometra – a womb infection which can be fatal if left untreated. Shams was once again rushed to PDSA where vets confirmed she needed urgent surgery.

“We knew that time was of the essence”, continued PDSA vet Hermione. “She was still recovering from her horrific road traffic accident so she was in a very fragile state. With extreme care, we were able to carry out the life-saving surgery she urgently needed. Now she will now need lots of rest, love and support as she makes a recovery. She’s very lucky to be alive considering what she’s been through.

“Common symptoms of pyometra include a bloated abdomen, discharge, lethargy drinking and weeing more than usual, and being off their food. A pyometra is an emergency and your cat or dog has the best chance of survival if they receive urgent treatment.”

Amira added: “Shams has beaten the odds and I can’t express the gratitude we have for PDSA and everything they did for her over the past few weeks.

“Shams means ‘sunshine’ in Arabic, and she continues to be our ray of light during these dark times, and it’s thanks to the incredible vets at PDSA and their emergency service that she’s still here with us. She’s getting stronger by the day and making a remarkable recovery.”

Thanks to the vital work of PDSA’s vets and vet nurses who are working around the clock to save pets’ lives during the coronavirus pandemic, Shams was able to receive life-saving treatment she so desperately needed.

In times of uncertainty and hardship, pets like Shams will still fall ill or be injured and need emergency, life-saving care, and we need your help. 

PDSA is urging animal lovers to donate what they can to ensure its vets and nurse can keep delivering its much-needed emergency service during these unprecedented times.





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PDSA is urging animal lovers to donate what they can to ensure its vets and nurse can keep delivering its much-needed emergency service during these unprecedented times.

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